Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee: 7 Things to Watch For

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee

When you’re looking for a horse property for sale in Tennessee – whether it’s near Franklin, Brentwood, Spring Hill or any other community, you probably already know a thing or two about what you need. However, this guide walks you through the seven things you probably want to watch out for as you’re hunting for the perfect equestrian property.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee: 7 Things to Watch For

When you’re looking for an equestrian property or ranch, it pays to know what to watch for. These seven things might need to be on your radar:

  1. Housing
  2. The right zoning
  3. HOA or covenants
  4. Water
  5. Grazing areas
  6. Slope and drainage
  7. Barns or loafing sheds

Here’s a closer look at each.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - Housing

#1. Housing

There’s a big difference between buying a home on a few acres and buying an equestrian property with a home on it. You’ll want to make sure that the home on the property meets your needs, and that it’s close enough to the facilities you’ll use for your horses (such as barns, watering areas and loafing sheds).

While you can always remodel a house later, you have to find something that’s going to meet your needs – at least structurally. Remember, too, that getting a horse ranch up and running is a big job; it might be a while before you get around to working on the house.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - Zoning

#2. The Right Zoning

Every county in Tennessee sets its own zoning restrictions. Some properties are okay for a few horses, but if you want to run a boarding facility and riding stable, you may have to look for a property that’s zoned differently. The key here is working closely with your REALTOR®, who will give you the guidance you need on zoning and restrictions that you need to look for in your property search.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - HOA or Covenants

#3. HOA or Covenants

Sometimes plots of land are in subdivided areas that belong to homeowners’ or property owners’ associations. When that happens, the association typically requires you to become one of its members – and there’s nearly always a monthly fee tied to your membership. Additionally, these associations set rules (called covenants) designed to preserve property values, and those rules might govern the numbers and types of animals you’re allowed to keep on the land. Discuss associations, dues and covenants with your REALTOR to make sure you’re buying the right type of horse farm for your needs.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - Water

#4. Water

Talk to your real estate agent about the type of water access you’ll need on the property, whether you want something with a well or one that’s connected to the community water supply. If there’s no water access, you’ll have to drill for a well yourself.

Pro tip: Equestrian properties require a lot of water, so it can get expensive if you’re connected to the community water supply. Sometimes it’s better to buy a property with a well or to drill a well yourself.


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Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - Grazing Areas

#5. Grazing Areas

Like water access, grazing areas are essential to running a horse property in Tennessee. Most farms already include grassy pastures, but when you’re searching for this type of land, you definitely need to plan for your needs 5, 10 or even 20 years down the road. You don’t want the size of your property to limit your decisions in the future.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - Slope and Drainage

#6. Slope and Drainage

Slope and drainage are just as important as water and grazing areas. The property you choose should already have adequate drainage – but if it doesn’t, you can still purchase it. You’ll just need to hire professionals or rework the land yourself to ensure your horses aren’t forced to stand around in mud.

Guide to Buying a Horse Property for Sale in Tennessee - Slope and Drainage

#7. Barns or Loafing Sheds

Shelter for your horses is always a big concern, so you might look for a property that already has a barn, stable and loafing sheds. If you find the perfect piece of land, though, you might be willing to build those yourself – just remember that it takes time. The most important thing is to let your REALTOR know how much you’re able to spend, what you expect from a property and what kind of leeway you have in your budget for properties that don’t meet your original specifications.

Are You Looking for a Horse Property in Tennessee?

If you’re searching for the perfect place to share with your horses – whether you have a handful or an entire herd – we can help.

Call us at 615-973-0020 or 615-973-0010 to tell us what you’re looking for in a Tennessee horse property. You can also fill out the form below and we’ll get back to you right away.

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